Bhutan “The Thunder Dragon Kingdom”

Bhutan, officially known as the Kingdom of Bhutan is a landlocked country in the Eastern Himalayas. It is a landlocked country in the Eastern Himalayas. It is bordered by China to the north and India to the south. Nepal and Bangladesh are located in proximity to Bhutan but do not share a land border.

The subalpine Himalayan mountains in the north rise from the country’s lush subtropical plains in the south. In the Bhutanese Himalayas, there are peaks higher than 7,000 meters above sea level. Gangkhar Puensum is Bhutan's highest peak and may also be the highest unclimbed mountain in the world. The wildlife of Bhutan is notable for its diversity, including the Himalayan takin. The largest city is the capital Thimphu.

The small and predominantly Buddhist nation of Bhutan, tucked between China and India, is lanced by deep ravines and coated with thick woods. The country has no traffic lights. Smoking, as well as tobacco products, are illegal, as are hunting and fishing (except for catch and release). It is forbidden to climb high peaks (where spirits dwell), and employees must wear traditional clothing - a Gho robe for men and Kira dress for women – during work hours. Years ago, Gross National happiness was identified by the nation as being more important than Gross National Product (GNP). Monasteries – often massive and commanding – abound; monks, when not in prayer or meditation or chores are often found playing board games, sharing stories, laughing, or all three. Archery is the national sport and green chili peppers together with ‘cheesy sauce’ Is the national dish. Ask any residents, and likely you’ll find truly do love their king and queen.

Bhutan’s flora is notable for its great variety and its continuous transition from tropical through temperate to exclusively alpine forms. The moist zone of tropical deciduous vegetation occupies the south, in the Duars Plain and adjoining hills. Tall, dense grasses used in the manufacture of paper and pulp are an important plant resource in the lower elevations. Forest of pine, with some oak, dominate the slopes. At higher elevations, the forests contain a mixture of many species – pine, oak, walnut, rhododendron, ash, poplar, willow, aspen, and magnolia. Alpine shrubs and grasses grow on the higher slopes of the Great Himalayas. Sambar deer, gaurs (type of wild ox), rhinoceros, elephants, tigers, and other animals are found in Bhutan, particularly among the Manas and Sunkoshi rivers in the central and eastern regions and the country's forest-covered hills. To preserve this wildlife and its natural environment, the government of Bhutan has established several protected areas, including the Royal Manas National Park (1966), which adjoints India along the banks of the Manas River and is home to the rare golden langur ( a slender long-tailed monkey). The extensive Jigme Dorji National Park (1974), in northwestern Bhutan, is unique in spanning all three of the country’s climate zones. 

Bhutan is a unique country both culturally and environmentally. Perched high in the Himalayas, it is the world's last remaining the Buddhist Kingdom. It has developed the philosophy of Gross National Happiness; where development is measured using a holistic approach of well-being, not just based on gross domestic product. Besides the stunning natural scenery, the enduring image of the country for most visitors is the strong sense of culture and tradition that binds the kingdom and clearly distinguishes it from its larger neighbor. Bhutan is the only Vajrayana Buddhist nation in the world, and the profound teachings of this tradition remain well preserved and exert a strong influence in all aspects of life. Due to its pristine environment and harmonious society, the tiny Kingdom of Bhutan has been called “The Last Shangrila.”